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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

The RejectedDr. Karl Bowman explaining Kinsey’s 1948 study on KQED’s “The Rejected,” September 1961

The hour-long documentary aired at 9:30 p.m. on Monday, September 11. Typical of most programs about homosexuality, “The Rejected” did not include lesbians. But it was perhaps the first scripted documentary to discuss homosexuality from a calm and rational point of view. Response was mostly positive. KQED was inundated with letters following the broadcast, with many of them requests for transcripts. Only a tiny minority, 3% according to station officials, wrote to complain. “The Rejected” also received critical acclaim, with the San Francisco Chronicle saying “KQED handled the subject soberly, calmly and in great depth.” It also received national notice, and was broadcast on several other public TV stations between 1961 and 1963, including in Tucson, Los Angeles, Portland and New York. Despite that, no film of the program is known to exist. Only the transcripts and news reports remain. More>

The Rejected
Dr. Karl Bowman explaining Kinsey’s 1948 study on KQED’s “The Rejected,” September 1961

The hour-long documentary aired at 9:30 p.m. on Monday, September 11. Typical of most programs about homosexuality, “The Rejected” did not include lesbians. But it was perhaps the first scripted documentary to discuss homosexuality from a calm and rational point of view. Response was mostly positive. KQED was inundated with letters following the broadcast, with many of them requests for transcripts. Only a tiny minority, 3% according to station officials, wrote to complain. “The Rejected” also received critical acclaim, with the San Francisco Chronicle saying “KQED handled the subject soberly, calmly and in great depth.” It also received national notice, and was broadcast on several other public TV stations between 1961 and 1963, including in Tucson, Los Angeles, Portland and New York. Despite that, no film of the program is known to exist. Only the transcripts and news reports remain. More>

Biconic Flashpoints: 4 Decades of Bay Area Bisexual PoliticPhoto from the exhibition May – Aug 2014GLBT History Museum, GLBT Historical Society, San Francisco

Drawing on materials from the personal archives of longtime bisexual activists as well as the holdings of the GLBT Historical Society’s archives, the Biconic Flashpoints exhibit showcases never-displayed artifacts, video, and photos from key moments in the Bay Area’s bisexual political history.

Biconic Flashpoints: 4 Decades of Bay Area Bisexual Politic
Photo from the exhibition May – Aug 2014
GLBT History Museum, GLBT Historical Society, San Francisco

Drawing on materials from the personal archives of longtime bisexual activists as well as the holdings of the GLBT Historical Society’s archives, the Biconic Flashpoints exhibit showcases never-displayed artifacts, video, and photos from key moments in the Bay Area’s bisexual political history.

Bobbi Campbell, “Aids Poster Boy”24 Jun 1983, San Francisco, California, USA© Roger Ressmeyer

Known as the “AIDS Poster Boy” for his efforts to humanize the disease. He was one of the first individuals affected by the epidemic, and was also the first person in the United States to publicly reveal himself as a person living with AIDS. He wrote numerous articles about the disease in the local gay newspaper, the San Francisco Sentinel.
In the spirit of Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence’s critique of stigma, Campbell wrote in one article: “Brothers and sisters, we understand… that by making us different, you protect yourself from “It.” However, despite our understanding of your need to see yourselves as different, we need to tell you that we are not.”  More >

Bobbi Campbell, “Aids Poster Boy”
24 Jun 1983, San Francisco, California, USA
© Roger Ressmeyer

Known as the “AIDS Poster Boy” for his efforts to humanize the disease. He was one of the first individuals affected by the epidemic, and was also the first person in the United States to publicly reveal himself as a person living with AIDS. He wrote numerous articles about the disease in the local gay newspaper, the San Francisco Sentinel.

In the spirit of Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence’s critique of stigma, Campbell wrote in one article: “Brothers and sisters, we understand… that by making us different, you protect yourself from “It.” However, despite our understanding of your need to see yourselves as different, we need to tell you that we are not.”  More >

Bobbi Campbell at the Clinical Nursing Conference on AIDS at NIH, October 7, 1983.
This is an excerpt from Sunday, October 9th, 1983 entry:

…We had to get up early in the morning to go to Bethesda for the Nat’l Institute of Health’s Nursing Clinical Conference on AIDS. I had threatened to disrupt the conference and denounce NIH if PWA’s [People with AIDS] were not included, so Artie [Artie Felsen] & I got to do a “poster session” off in a separate room. We had two posters (they were a drag to carry on the plane). One had photos of PWAs and one had literature that we had developed. Interestingly, the nurses protected themselves professionally from feelings by glancing at the photos and flocking to the printed word. Many people didn’t look twice, much less speak, to the real people. Dressing for the part, I was in white pants, white shoes, and a clinical lab coat….

Bobbi Campbell Diary, MSS 96-33, folder 3, envelope 4. 
UCSF Library and Center for Knowledge Management, Archives and Special Collections, University of California, San Francisco.

Bobbi Campbell at the Clinical Nursing Conference on AIDS at NIH, October 7, 1983.

This is an excerpt from Sunday, October 9th, 1983 entry:

…We had to get up early in the morning to go to Bethesda for the Nat’l Institute of Health’s Nursing Clinical Conference on AIDS. I had threatened to disrupt the conference and denounce NIH if PWA’s [People with AIDS] were not included, so Artie [Artie Felsen] & I got to do a “poster session” off in a separate room. We had two posters (they were a drag to carry on the plane). One had photos of PWAs and one had literature that we had developed. Interestingly, the nurses protected themselves professionally from feelings by glancing at the photos and flocking to the printed word. Many people didn’t look twice, much less speak, to the real people. Dressing for the part, I was in white pants, white shoes, and a clinical lab coat….

Bobbi Campbell Diary, MSS 96-33, folder 3, envelope 4.

UCSF Library and Center for Knowledge Management, Archives and Special Collections, University of California, San Francisco.

Play Fair, 1982

In 1982 the San Francisco Order of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence produced what was to become a landmark document in the emerging AIDS crisis. Play Fair was probably the first safer sex material written by and for gay men.

The brochure was probably also the first such document to use humour to put across an extremely serious message.

Text from the brochure & more >