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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

Fifty-five hundred people assemble at Hollywood High School before marching through Hollywood to protest possible anti-gay legislation sparked by singer Anita Bryant.
June 13, 1977, LA Times/UCLA

Fifty-five hundred people assemble at Hollywood High School before marching through Hollywood to protest possible anti-gay legislation sparked by singer Anita Bryant.

June 13, 1977, LA Times/UCLA

‘Patient Zero’
Marked up page from “The 25 Most Intriguing People of ‘87,” People, December 28, 1987
Courtesy Archives and Special Collections, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California, San Francisco

People magazine featured Gaétan Dugas as Patient Zero, naming him one of 1987’s most intriguing people by incorrectly blaming him for infecting America with AIDS. The editors pulled Dugas’s story from And the Band Played On, a widely read chronicle of the AIDS crisis by gay journalist Randy Shilts. The book’s tale of Patient Zero, which was at odds with existing scientific evidence, overshadowed its more substantive account of government negligence. By relying on age-old stereotypes of gay men as catty, promiscuous, and more interested in sex than health, Shilts’s book and the People magazine selection from it prompted angry, homophobic responses. This marked up copy of People magazine, anonymously mailed to the San Francisco AIDS Foundation exemplifies negative reactions.

‘Patient Zero’

Marked up page from “The 25 Most Intriguing People of ‘87,” People, December 28, 1987

Courtesy Archives and Special Collections, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California, San Francisco

People magazine featured Gaétan Dugas as Patient Zero, naming him one of 1987’s most intriguing people by incorrectly blaming him for infecting America with AIDS. The editors pulled Dugas’s story from And the Band Played On, a widely read chronicle of the AIDS crisis by gay journalist Randy Shilts. The book’s tale of Patient Zero, which was at odds with existing scientific evidence, overshadowed its more substantive account of government negligence. By relying on age-old stereotypes of gay men as catty, promiscuous, and more interested in sex than health, Shilts’s book and the People magazine selection from it prompted angry, homophobic responses. This marked up copy of People magazine, anonymously mailed to the San Francisco AIDS Foundation exemplifies negative reactions.

Hoover and TolsonClyde Tolson joined the FBI in 1928 and rose to become Assistant Director within three years. Tolson and Edgar were lovers and vacationed together every year. Just as Roy Cohn — closeted and self-hating — would help to persecute thousands of gays and lesbians as major players in the Lavender Scare. 

Hoover and Tolson
Clyde Tolson joined the FBI in 1928 and rose to become Assistant Director within three years. Tolson and Edgar were lovers and vacationed together every year. Just as Roy Cohncloseted and self-hating — would help to persecute thousands of gays and lesbians as major players in the Lavender Scare. 

The Candlestick Murder Charleston, South Carolina, News and Courier, November 2, 1958

Jack Dobbins, a 30-year-old Charleston chemical company executive was clubbed to death with a heavy brass candlestick, in his home Halloween night 1958.
Charleston Air Force Base, Airman 3rd Class John Joseph Mahon surrendered “upon having read of Dobbins’ death.” He was charged and held without bail. Facing the death penalty at trial, Mahon’s lawyers used a homosexual-panic defense. Despite the conflicting testimony, Mahon received a not guilty verdict after only eight minutes of jury deliberation.
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The Candlestick Murder
Charleston, South Carolina, News and Courier, November 2, 1958

Jack Dobbins, a 30-year-old Charleston chemical company executive was clubbed to death with a heavy brass candlestick, in his home Halloween night 1958.

Charleston Air Force Base, Airman 3rd Class John Joseph Mahon surrendered “upon having read of Dobbins’ death.” He was charged and held without bail. Facing the death penalty at trial, Mahon’s lawyers used a homosexual-panic defense. Despite the conflicting testimony, Mahon received a not guilty verdict after only eight minutes of jury deliberation.

More >