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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

Woe! is any homosexual that has to put up with the Jeffrey Harts of the world…
Like his previous installment, on homosexual “glory holes,” Jeffrey Hart offers insights into homosexual “bathhouses,” the homosexual agenda and this new term homophobia…

America’s homosexual woesop-ed by Jeffrey Hart  |  King Features SyndicateKentucky New Era   |  July 31, 1993
homophobia: ‘disapproval of the abnormal’

Woe! is any homosexual that has to put up with the Jeffrey Harts of the world…

Like his previous installment, on homosexual “glory holes,” Jeffrey Hart offers insights into homosexual “bathhouses,” the homosexual agenda and this new term homophobia…

America’s homosexual woes
op-ed by Jeffrey Hart  |  King Features Syndicate
Kentucky New Era   |  July 31, 1993

homophobia: ‘disapproval of the abnormal’

The Making of “Monsters”  |  Dir. John Greyson, 1991

During his residency at the Canadian Film Centre in 1991, John Greyson, the enfant terrible of gay cinema in Canada, directed The Making of “Monsters,” a short film dealing with the 1985 murder of a gay schoolteacher by five teenage boys in Toronto’s High Park. This fictional documentary chronicles a movie-of-the-week version of the event. There is a movie-within-the-movie produced by Hungarian Marxist and literary critic and theorist Georg Lukacs and directed by Bertolt Brecht, who inexplicably appears as a catfish in a bowl.
Brilliantly incorporating everything from Marxist aesthetics to hockey machismo to tire fires, Greyson made a film that is immensely enjoyable as well as a strong, fearless statement of gay pride. The Making of “Monsters”established John Greyson as one of Canada’s brightest talents.

If you have the chance to see this film, I recommend it. As a glimpse into the 80s queer struggle for safety and equal treatment under the law, it is enlightening. While seeking to counter mainstream cultural paradigms of masculinity, sex, and sexuality, Greyson deploys biting truths and scathing satire in catchy songs and choreographed dance. The film culminates in a call to action for all queers to bash back, and fight oppression together. Queer cinema at its finest.

The Making of “Monsters”  |  Dir. John Greyson, 1991

During his residency at the Canadian Film Centre in 1991, John Greyson, the enfant terrible of gay cinema in Canada, directed The Making of “Monsters,” a short film dealing with the 1985 murder of a gay schoolteacher by five teenage boys in Toronto’s High Park. This fictional documentary chronicles a movie-of-the-week version of the event. There is a movie-within-the-movie produced by Hungarian Marxist and literary critic and theorist Georg Lukacs and directed by Bertolt Brecht, who inexplicably appears as a catfish in a bowl.

Brilliantly incorporating everything from Marxist aesthetics to hockey machismo to tire fires, Greyson made a film that is immensely enjoyable as well as a strong, fearless statement of gay pride. The Making of “Monsters”established John Greyson as one of Canada’s brightest talents.

If you have the chance to see this film, I recommend it. As a glimpse into the 80s queer struggle for safety and equal treatment under the law, it is enlightening. While seeking to counter mainstream cultural paradigms of masculinity, sex, and sexuality, Greyson deploys biting truths and scathing satire in catchy songs and choreographed dance. The film culminates in a call to action for all queers to bash back, and fight oppression together. Queer cinema at its finest.

Fifty-five hundred people assemble at Hollywood High School before marching through Hollywood to protest possible anti-gay legislation sparked by singer Anita Bryant.
June 13, 1977, LA Times/UCLA

Fifty-five hundred people assemble at Hollywood High School before marching through Hollywood to protest possible anti-gay legislation sparked by singer Anita Bryant.

June 13, 1977, LA Times/UCLA

‘Patient Zero’
Marked up page from “The 25 Most Intriguing People of ‘87,” People, December 28, 1987
Courtesy Archives and Special Collections, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California, San Francisco

People magazine featured Gaétan Dugas as Patient Zero, naming him one of 1987’s most intriguing people by incorrectly blaming him for infecting America with AIDS. The editors pulled Dugas’s story from And the Band Played On, a widely read chronicle of the AIDS crisis by gay journalist Randy Shilts. The book’s tale of Patient Zero, which was at odds with existing scientific evidence, overshadowed its more substantive account of government negligence. By relying on age-old stereotypes of gay men as catty, promiscuous, and more interested in sex than health, Shilts’s book and the People magazine selection from it prompted angry, homophobic responses. This marked up copy of People magazine, anonymously mailed to the San Francisco AIDS Foundation exemplifies negative reactions.

‘Patient Zero’

Marked up page from “The 25 Most Intriguing People of ‘87,” People, December 28, 1987

Courtesy Archives and Special Collections, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California, San Francisco

People magazine featured Gaétan Dugas as Patient Zero, naming him one of 1987’s most intriguing people by incorrectly blaming him for infecting America with AIDS. The editors pulled Dugas’s story from And the Band Played On, a widely read chronicle of the AIDS crisis by gay journalist Randy Shilts. The book’s tale of Patient Zero, which was at odds with existing scientific evidence, overshadowed its more substantive account of government negligence. By relying on age-old stereotypes of gay men as catty, promiscuous, and more interested in sex than health, Shilts’s book and the People magazine selection from it prompted angry, homophobic responses. This marked up copy of People magazine, anonymously mailed to the San Francisco AIDS Foundation exemplifies negative reactions.