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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

collectivehistory:

The gay club Eldorado in Berlin
Berlin was the leading city for homosexuals during the 1920s with clubs and even newspapers for both lesbians and gay men. The lesbian magazine Die Freundin was started by Friedrich Radszuweit and the gay men magazine Der Eigene had already started in 1896 as the world’s first gay magazine. The first gay demonstration ever took place in Nollendorfplatz in 1922 in Berlin, gathering 400 homosexuals. The homosexual doctor Magnus Hirschfeld did many things to improve the situation for gays. Berlin was well known as the decadent city during the 1920s, which is shown in the musical and movie Cabaret.

collectivehistory:

The gay club Eldorado in Berlin

Berlin was the leading city for homosexuals during the 1920s with clubs and even newspapers for both lesbians and gay men. The lesbian magazine Die Freundin was started by Friedrich Radszuweit and the gay men magazine Der Eigene had already started in 1896 as the world’s first gay magazine. The first gay demonstration ever took place in Nollendorfplatz in 1922 in Berlin, gathering 400 homosexuals. The homosexual doctor Magnus Hirschfeld did many things to improve the situation for gays. Berlin was well known as the decadent city during the 1920s, which is shown in the musical and movie Cabaret.

(via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

deviatesinc:

Gay Liberation Front pickets Barney’s Beanery regarding their posting of “Fagots [sic] Stay Out” signs. 1969.

[Barney’s Beanery Owner] John Anthony put up a sign among the old license plates and other ephemera along the wall behind the bar that read “FAGOTS [sic] – STAY OUT”. Though the owner was known to be antagonistic towards gays, going as far as posing (in front of his sign) for a picture in a 1964 Life article on “Homosexuality in America” over a caption where he exclaims “I don’t like ‘em…”, the sign was ostensibly put up as a response to pressure from the police who had a tendency towards discriminatory practices against homosexuals and consequently establishments that catered to the group.

The owner died in 1968, and efforts continued to have the sign removed. A coalition of gay activist groups organized a zap of the restaurant on February 7, 1970, to push for its removal. The sign came down that day. The sign was put up and taken down several times over the next 14 years, and the restaurant’s matchbooks also bore the line, but the practice ended in December 1984, days after the city of West Hollywood voted itself into existence. The then-mayor, Valerie Terrigno, the entire city council and gay rights activists marched into Barney’s and relieved the wall of the offending sign. It was held by Morris Kight for many years and now rests in the ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives.

Protest after a police raid at the Black Cat, a gay bar in Silverlake, February 1967.— ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives.

Protest after a police raid at the Black Cat, a gay bar in Silverlake, February 1967.
— ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives.