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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

Homosexuals taking more militant stand for their civil rightsBarnard Gavzer  |  Eugene Register-Guard  |  June 29, 1970

EDITOR’S NOTE — There’s black power. And women power. Now, gay power? Homosexuals caught in the bind between their unconventional sexual preferences and society’s prohibitions, are militantly making an issue of their civil rights.

Homosexuals taking more militant stand for their civil rights
Barnard Gavzer  |  Eugene Register-Guard  |  June 29, 1970

EDITOR’S NOTE — There’s black power. And women power. Now, gay power? Homosexuals caught in the bind between their unconventional sexual preferences and society’s prohibitions, are militantly making an issue of their civil rights.

I want in the military industrial complex too!

‘Don’t ask, don’t tell’ still unfairop-ed by Angelo Presicci  |  July 21, 1993Wilmington Morning Star News  |  Wilmington, NC

hrm, a San Francisco writer, no less… well, you know what they’re like, don’t you, Maude…

I want in the military industrial complex too!

‘Don’t ask, don’t tell’ still unfair
op-ed by Angelo Presicci  |  July 21, 1993
Wilmington Morning Star News  |  Wilmington, NC

hrm, a San Francisco writer, no less…
well, you know what they’re like, don’t you, Maude…

Dewey’s, pre-Stonewall fight for equality, Philadelphia, 1965

In 1965, the management of the Dewey’s at 219 S 17th Street near Rittenhouse Square (now Little Pete’s) made it clear that they would refuse service “to a large number of homosexuals and persons wearing non-conformist clothing.” Modeled on the current African-American civil rights protests, on Sunday, April 25th, more than 150 protestors, black, white, trans, lesbian and gay staged a sit-in, an amazing thing to do in Philadelphia in 1965, four years before the Stonewall riots. Police arrived and three of the protestors who refused to leave were arrested. They were young; two males and a female.

Journalist and activist Clark Polak and the Janus Society, a local gay rights group, were notified. Over the next week, in support of the protestors, they distributed some 1,500 leaflets outside the restaurant [photo, above].On Sunday, May 2, they staged a second sit-in. This time, when the police were called, they spoke with the protestors and simply left, declining to take any action at all, [see photo, bottom, of the police at Dewey’s in 1965]. The management agreed to end the discrimination and the protestors left, having staged the first successful gay rights sit-in in the country. This marked an important step in the struggle for LGBT people to lay claim to the right to public space in 1960s Philadelphia.

Hippie Faggots! Smash the Church, Smash the State!

Out in Berkeley, California, the only gay bar in the city, the White Horse Inn, refused to serve hippie faggots. Nick Benton writes in the recent anthology, Smash the Church, Smash the State! The Early Years of Gay Liberation, “A picket line [was] thrown up in front of the bar by some gay radical brothers and sisters, protesting the fact that long-haired, hippie type gays were not welcome in the bar and that touching was, naturally in that day, also prohibited.” Such discrimination is not unusual within freedom movements. In their drive for mainstream acceptance, the gay and lesbian movement, like the civil rights movement before it, has been divided over how much to compromise in efforts to gain mainstream acceptance. Older gay men, for whom just being able to go to a gay bar was a huge step forward, were understandably worried about loosing their toehold on propriety by associating with social outcasts like hippies or drag queens, both of whom were pushing the boundaries of acceptable behavior.

There should be no compromise! 

Hippie Faggots! Smash the Church, Smash the State!

Out in Berkeley, California, the only gay bar in the city, the White Horse Inn, refused to serve hippie faggots. Nick Benton writes in the recent anthology, Smash the Church, Smash the State! The Early Years of Gay Liberation, “A picket line [was] thrown up in front of the bar by some gay radical brothers and sisters, protesting the fact that long-haired, hippie type gays were not welcome in the bar and that touching was, naturally in that day, also prohibited.” Such discrimination is not unusual within freedom movements. In their drive for mainstream acceptance, the gay and lesbian movement, like the civil rights movement before it, has been divided over how much to compromise in efforts to gain mainstream acceptance. Older gay men, for whom just being able to go to a gay bar was a huge step forward, were understandably worried about loosing their toehold on propriety by associating with social outcasts like hippies or drag queens, both of whom were pushing the boundaries of acceptable behavior.

There should be no compromise!