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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

Radicalesbians

1970s lesbians were being stifled by the Women’s Movement because of their sexuality, and by the Gay Liberation Front because of their gender…
The Radicalesbians decided to branch off and revel in their radicalness… they ended up dramatically challenging heteronormativity and, subsequently, sex-based gender roles in ways that no other Feminists previously had. They harnessed all their assumed weirdness and made a game-changing movement out of it. They moved Feminism forward even after the movement rejected them. … more >

Radicalesbians

1970s lesbians were being stifled by the Women’s Movement because of their sexuality, and by the Gay Liberation Front because of their gender…

The Radicalesbians decided to branch off and revel in their radicalness… they ended up dramatically challenging heteronormativity and, subsequently, sex-based gender roles in ways that no other Feminists previously had. They harnessed all their assumed weirdness and made a game-changing movement out of it. They moved Feminism forward even after the movement rejected them. … more >

Beautiful!
Untitled [I am a Lesbian and Beautiful]by John Storey, 1971, © John Storey

Out of the Closets, into the Streets: Gay Liberation Photography, 1971-73
The exhibition Out of the closets, into the streets: gay liberation photography 1971-73 pictures the very beginning of the gay liberation movement in Australia through the work of Philip Potter, John Storey, John Englart, Barbara Creed, Ponch Hawkes and Rennie Ellis. The exhibition examines for the first time images from the period as works of art as much as social documents. The title of the exhibition is a slogan from the period.
As gay people found their voice in the early 1970s artists, often at the very beginning of their careers, were there to capture meetings in lounge rooms, consciousness raising groups and street protests. The liberation movement meant ‘being there’, putting your body on the line.

Beautiful!

Untitled [I am a Lesbian and Beautiful]
by John Storey, 1971, © John Storey

Out of the Closets, into the Streets: Gay Liberation Photography, 1971-73

The exhibition Out of the closets, into the streets: gay liberation photography 1971-73 pictures the very beginning of the gay liberation movement in Australia through the work of Philip Potter, John Storey, John Englart, Barbara Creed, Ponch Hawkes and Rennie Ellis. The exhibition examines for the first time images from the period as works of art as much as social documents. The title of the exhibition is a slogan from the period.

As gay people found their voice in the early 1970s artists, often at the very beginning of their careers, were there to capture meetings in lounge rooms, consciousness raising groups and street protests. The liberation movement meant ‘being there’, putting your body on the line.

Queens!
Untitled [Queens]by Phillip Potter, 1971, © Phillip Potter

Out of the Closets, into the Streets: Gay Liberation Photography, 1971-73
The exhibition Out of the closets, into the streets: gay liberation photography 1971-73 pictures the very beginning of the gay liberation movement in Australia through the work of Philip Potter, John Storey, John Englart, Barbara Creed, Ponch Hawkes and Rennie Ellis. The exhibition examines for the first time images from the period as works of art as much as social documents. The title of the exhibition is a slogan from the period.
As gay people found their voice in the early 1970s artists, often at the very beginning of their careers, were there to capture meetings in lounge rooms, consciousness raising groups and street protests. The liberation movement meant ‘being there’, putting your body on the line.

Queens!

Untitled [Queens]
by Phillip Potter, 1971, © Phillip Potter

Out of the Closets, into the Streets: Gay Liberation Photography, 1971-73

The exhibition Out of the closets, into the streets: gay liberation photography 1971-73 pictures the very beginning of the gay liberation movement in Australia through the work of Philip Potter, John Storey, John Englart, Barbara Creed, Ponch Hawkes and Rennie Ellis. The exhibition examines for the first time images from the period as works of art as much as social documents. The title of the exhibition is a slogan from the period.

As gay people found their voice in the early 1970s artists, often at the very beginning of their careers, were there to capture meetings in lounge rooms, consciousness raising groups and street protests. The liberation movement meant ‘being there’, putting your body on the line.