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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

Hippie Faggots! Smash the Church, Smash the State!

Out in Berkeley, California, the only gay bar in the city, the White Horse Inn, refused to serve hippie faggots. Nick Benton writes in the recent anthology, Smash the Church, Smash the State! The Early Years of Gay Liberation, “A picket line [was] thrown up in front of the bar by some gay radical brothers and sisters, protesting the fact that long-haired, hippie type gays were not welcome in the bar and that touching was, naturally in that day, also prohibited.” Such discrimination is not unusual within freedom movements. In their drive for mainstream acceptance, the gay and lesbian movement, like the civil rights movement before it, has been divided over how much to compromise in efforts to gain mainstream acceptance. Older gay men, for whom just being able to go to a gay bar was a huge step forward, were understandably worried about loosing their toehold on propriety by associating with social outcasts like hippies or drag queens, both of whom were pushing the boundaries of acceptable behavior.

There should be no compromise! 

Hippie Faggots! Smash the Church, Smash the State!

Out in Berkeley, California, the only gay bar in the city, the White Horse Inn, refused to serve hippie faggots. Nick Benton writes in the recent anthology, Smash the Church, Smash the State! The Early Years of Gay Liberation, “A picket line [was] thrown up in front of the bar by some gay radical brothers and sisters, protesting the fact that long-haired, hippie type gays were not welcome in the bar and that touching was, naturally in that day, also prohibited.” Such discrimination is not unusual within freedom movements. In their drive for mainstream acceptance, the gay and lesbian movement, like the civil rights movement before it, has been divided over how much to compromise in efforts to gain mainstream acceptance. Older gay men, for whom just being able to go to a gay bar was a huge step forward, were understandably worried about loosing their toehold on propriety by associating with social outcasts like hippies or drag queens, both of whom were pushing the boundaries of acceptable behavior.

There should be no compromise! 

LaRouche Initiative

June 29, 1986. Marchers carrying a banner and signs protesting California Proposition 64 — known as the LaRouche Initiative, after political activist Lyndon LaRouche, who proposed it — parade down San Francisco’s Market Street during the 17th annual Freedom Day Parade. The LaRouche Initiative, which was on the Nov. 4, 1986, ballot, proposed that all AIDS patients be quarantined and barred from school and food service jobs. It was rejected.

Photo: Jim Gerberich  /  The Associated Press

LaRouche Initiative

June 29, 1986. Marchers carrying a banner and signs protesting California Proposition 64 — known as the LaRouche Initiative, after political activist Lyndon LaRouche, who proposed it — parade down San Francisco’s Market Street during the 17th annual Freedom Day Parade. The LaRouche Initiative, which was on the Nov. 4, 1986, ballot, proposed that all AIDS patients be quarantined and barred from school and food service jobs. It was rejected.

Photo: Jim Gerberich  /  The Associated Press

The Briggs Initiative Protest, 1978

The Briggs Initiative sought to ban gays and lesbians from serving as public school teachers in California. It also would have allowed for civil lawsuits against school employees seen to be supporting gay rights.

Photo by Pat Rocco. Courtesy ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives

The Briggs Initiative Protest, 1978

The Briggs Initiative sought to ban gays and lesbians from serving as public school teachers in California. It also would have allowed for civil lawsuits against school employees seen to be supporting gay rights.

Photo by Pat Rocco. Courtesy ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives

A group of AIDS activists march in front of Oakland City Hall. April 1, 1989. Michael Macor, photographer. Gelatin silver print. Collection of Oakland Museum of California. The Oakland Tribune Collection. Gift of ANG Newspapers.

A group of AIDS activists march in front of Oakland City Hall. April 1, 1989.
Michael Macor, photographer. Gelatin silver print. Collection of Oakland Museum of California. The Oakland Tribune Collection. Gift of ANG Newspapers.