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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

Biconic Flashpoints: 4 Decades of Bay Area Bisexual PoliticPhoto from the exhibition May – Aug 2014GLBT History Museum, GLBT Historical Society, San Francisco

Drawing on materials from the personal archives of longtime bisexual activists as well as the holdings of the GLBT Historical Society’s archives, the Biconic Flashpoints exhibit showcases never-displayed artifacts, video, and photos from key moments in the Bay Area’s bisexual political history.

Biconic Flashpoints: 4 Decades of Bay Area Bisexual Politic
Photo from the exhibition May – Aug 2014
GLBT History Museum, GLBT Historical Society, San Francisco

Drawing on materials from the personal archives of longtime bisexual activists as well as the holdings of the GLBT Historical Society’s archives, the Biconic Flashpoints exhibit showcases never-displayed artifacts, video, and photos from key moments in the Bay Area’s bisexual political history.

Bobbi Campbell, “Aids Poster Boy”24 Jun 1983, San Francisco, California, USA© Roger Ressmeyer

Known as the “AIDS Poster Boy” for his efforts to humanize the disease. He was one of the first individuals affected by the epidemic, and was also the first person in the United States to publicly reveal himself as a person living with AIDS. He wrote numerous articles about the disease in the local gay newspaper, the San Francisco Sentinel.
In the spirit of Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence’s critique of stigma, Campbell wrote in one article: “Brothers and sisters, we understand… that by making us different, you protect yourself from “It.” However, despite our understanding of your need to see yourselves as different, we need to tell you that we are not.”  More >

Bobbi Campbell, “Aids Poster Boy”
24 Jun 1983, San Francisco, California, USA
© Roger Ressmeyer

Known as the “AIDS Poster Boy” for his efforts to humanize the disease. He was one of the first individuals affected by the epidemic, and was also the first person in the United States to publicly reveal himself as a person living with AIDS. He wrote numerous articles about the disease in the local gay newspaper, the San Francisco Sentinel.

In the spirit of Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence’s critique of stigma, Campbell wrote in one article: “Brothers and sisters, we understand… that by making us different, you protect yourself from “It.” However, despite our understanding of your need to see yourselves as different, we need to tell you that we are not.”  More >

Play Fair, 1982

In 1982 the San Francisco Order of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence produced what was to become a landmark document in the emerging AIDS crisis. Play Fair was probably the first safer sex material written by and for gay men.

The brochure was probably also the first such document to use humour to put across an extremely serious message.

Text from the brochure & more >

Castro Sweep, October 6,1989

San Francisco police line the sidewalk near City Hall to prevent marchers from claiming a lane in the street. Photo: Brian McNally.
…SFPD said, “If we can get ACT UP in the Castro, we’ll have won the war” and proceeded to beat up AIDS activists at Castro and Market and occupy the Castro, trapping everyone in the bars and restaurants all the way to 19th St.…

Castro Sweep, October 6,1989

San Francisco police line the sidewalk near City Hall to prevent marchers from claiming a lane in the street. Photo: Brian McNally.

…SFPD said, “If we can get ACT UP in the Castro, we’ll have won the war” and proceeded to beat up AIDS activists at Castro and Market and occupy the Castro, trapping everyone in the bars and restaurants all the way to 19th St.…

The sickness label was an albatross around the neck of our early gay rights groups — it infected all our work on other issues. Anything we said on our behalf could be dismissed as ‘That’s just your sickness talking.’ The sickness label was used to justify discrimination, especially in employment, and especially by our own government.
Barbara Gittings
The Vote that ‘Cured’ Millions
The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide, July 2007
Homosexuals taking more militant stand for their civil rightsBarnard Gavzer  |  Eugene Register-Guard  |  June 29, 1970

EDITOR’S NOTE — There’s black power. And women power. Now, gay power? Homosexuals caught in the bind between their unconventional sexual preferences and society’s prohibitions, are militantly making an issue of their civil rights.

Homosexuals taking more militant stand for their civil rights
Barnard Gavzer  |  Eugene Register-Guard  |  June 29, 1970

EDITOR’S NOTE — There’s black power. And women power. Now, gay power? Homosexuals caught in the bind between their unconventional sexual preferences and society’s prohibitions, are militantly making an issue of their civil rights.