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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

Castro Sweep, October 6,1989

San Francisco police line the sidewalk near City Hall to prevent marchers from claiming a lane in the street. Photo: Brian McNally.
…SFPD said, “If we can get ACT UP in the Castro, we’ll have won the war” and proceeded to beat up AIDS activists at Castro and Market and occupy the Castro, trapping everyone in the bars and restaurants all the way to 19th St.…

Castro Sweep, October 6,1989

San Francisco police line the sidewalk near City Hall to prevent marchers from claiming a lane in the street. Photo: Brian McNally.

…SFPD said, “If we can get ACT UP in the Castro, we’ll have won the war” and proceeded to beat up AIDS activists at Castro and Market and occupy the Castro, trapping everyone in the bars and restaurants all the way to 19th St.…

The sickness label was an albatross around the neck of our early gay rights groups — it infected all our work on other issues. Anything we said on our behalf could be dismissed as ‘That’s just your sickness talking.’ The sickness label was used to justify discrimination, especially in employment, and especially by our own government.
Barbara Gittings
The Vote that ‘Cured’ Millions
The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide, July 2007
Homosexuals taking more militant stand for their civil rightsBarnard Gavzer  |  Eugene Register-Guard  |  June 29, 1970

EDITOR’S NOTE — There’s black power. And women power. Now, gay power? Homosexuals caught in the bind between their unconventional sexual preferences and society’s prohibitions, are militantly making an issue of their civil rights.

Homosexuals taking more militant stand for their civil rights
Barnard Gavzer  |  Eugene Register-Guard  |  June 29, 1970

EDITOR’S NOTE — There’s black power. And women power. Now, gay power? Homosexuals caught in the bind between their unconventional sexual preferences and society’s prohibitions, are militantly making an issue of their civil rights.

Beautiful!
Untitled [I am a Lesbian and Beautiful]by John Storey, 1971, © John Storey

Out of the Closets, into the Streets: Gay Liberation Photography, 1971-73
The exhibition Out of the closets, into the streets: gay liberation photography 1971-73 pictures the very beginning of the gay liberation movement in Australia through the work of Philip Potter, John Storey, John Englart, Barbara Creed, Ponch Hawkes and Rennie Ellis. The exhibition examines for the first time images from the period as works of art as much as social documents. The title of the exhibition is a slogan from the period.
As gay people found their voice in the early 1970s artists, often at the very beginning of their careers, were there to capture meetings in lounge rooms, consciousness raising groups and street protests. The liberation movement meant ‘being there’, putting your body on the line.

Beautiful!

Untitled [I am a Lesbian and Beautiful]
by John Storey, 1971, © John Storey

Out of the Closets, into the Streets: Gay Liberation Photography, 1971-73

The exhibition Out of the closets, into the streets: gay liberation photography 1971-73 pictures the very beginning of the gay liberation movement in Australia through the work of Philip Potter, John Storey, John Englart, Barbara Creed, Ponch Hawkes and Rennie Ellis. The exhibition examines for the first time images from the period as works of art as much as social documents. The title of the exhibition is a slogan from the period.

As gay people found their voice in the early 1970s artists, often at the very beginning of their careers, were there to capture meetings in lounge rooms, consciousness raising groups and street protests. The liberation movement meant ‘being there’, putting your body on the line.

Queens!
Untitled [Queens]by Phillip Potter, 1971, © Phillip Potter

Out of the Closets, into the Streets: Gay Liberation Photography, 1971-73
The exhibition Out of the closets, into the streets: gay liberation photography 1971-73 pictures the very beginning of the gay liberation movement in Australia through the work of Philip Potter, John Storey, John Englart, Barbara Creed, Ponch Hawkes and Rennie Ellis. The exhibition examines for the first time images from the period as works of art as much as social documents. The title of the exhibition is a slogan from the period.
As gay people found their voice in the early 1970s artists, often at the very beginning of their careers, were there to capture meetings in lounge rooms, consciousness raising groups and street protests. The liberation movement meant ‘being there’, putting your body on the line.

Queens!

Untitled [Queens]
by Phillip Potter, 1971, © Phillip Potter

Out of the Closets, into the Streets: Gay Liberation Photography, 1971-73

The exhibition Out of the closets, into the streets: gay liberation photography 1971-73 pictures the very beginning of the gay liberation movement in Australia through the work of Philip Potter, John Storey, John Englart, Barbara Creed, Ponch Hawkes and Rennie Ellis. The exhibition examines for the first time images from the period as works of art as much as social documents. The title of the exhibition is a slogan from the period.

As gay people found their voice in the early 1970s artists, often at the very beginning of their careers, were there to capture meetings in lounge rooms, consciousness raising groups and street protests. The liberation movement meant ‘being there’, putting your body on the line.