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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

Fifty-five hundred people assemble at Hollywood High School before marching through Hollywood to protest possible anti-gay legislation sparked by singer Anita Bryant.
June 13, 1977, LA Times/UCLA

Fifty-five hundred people assemble at Hollywood High School before marching through Hollywood to protest possible anti-gay legislation sparked by singer Anita Bryant.

June 13, 1977, LA Times/UCLA

Police officers stand watch over activists at Storm the NIH protest, May 21, 1990

In one of its most dramatic and effective national protests, ACT UP chapters from across the country occupied the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on May 21, 1990. During Storm the NIH, protestors staged a “die in” and plastered buildings with signs and banners to illustrate their demands for governmental action on AIDS treatment. Responding to a wave of activism, Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at NIH, initiated changes in the testing of AIDS drugs.

Courtesy Donna Binder

Police officers stand watch over activists at Storm the NIH protest, May 21, 1990

In one of its most dramatic and effective national protests, ACT UP chapters from across the country occupied the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on May 21, 1990. During Storm the NIH, protestors staged a “die in” and plastered buildings with signs and banners to illustrate their demands for governmental action on AIDS treatment. Responding to a wave of activism, Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at NIH, initiated changes in the testing of AIDS drugs.

Courtesy Donna Binder

Poster for the Department of Health and Human Services demonstration designed by ACT UP/DC WoMen’s Committee, 1990

In October 1990, ACT UP descended upon Washington and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, carrying signs that demanded the formal definition of AIDS change to include women. Excluded from the diagnosis of having AIDS, women could not access potentially lifesaving care and treatment, even as they died of the disease.

Courtesy National Library of Medicine

Poster for the Department of Health and Human Services demonstration designed by ACT UP/DC WoMen’s Committee, 1990

In October 1990, ACT UP descended upon Washington and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, carrying signs that demanded the formal definition of AIDS change to include women. Excluded from the diagnosis of having AIDS, women could not access potentially lifesaving care and treatment, even as they died of the disease.

Courtesy National Library of Medicine

Protestors in front of the Department of Health and Human Services, during the national campaign to change the definition of AIDS, October 2, 1990

With chapters across the country, ACT UP held thousands of demonstrations between 1987 and 1996, including one at the Department of Health and Human Services to insist that women with AIDS receive care and treatment. Their actions transformed how scientists and politicians responded to the AIDS crisis.

Courtesy Donna Binder

Protestors in front of the Department of Health and Human Services, during the national campaign to change the definition of AIDS, October 2, 1990

With chapters across the country, ACT UP held thousands of demonstrations between 1987 and 1996, including one at the Department of Health and Human Services to insist that women with AIDS receive care and treatment. Their actions transformed how scientists and politicians responded to the AIDS crisis.

Courtesy Donna Binder

LaRouche Initiative

June 29, 1986. Marchers carrying a banner and signs protesting California Proposition 64 — known as the LaRouche Initiative, after political activist Lyndon LaRouche, who proposed it — parade down San Francisco’s Market Street during the 17th annual Freedom Day Parade. The LaRouche Initiative, which was on the Nov. 4, 1986, ballot, proposed that all AIDS patients be quarantined and barred from school and food service jobs. It was rejected.

Photo: Jim Gerberich  /  The Associated Press

LaRouche Initiative

June 29, 1986. Marchers carrying a banner and signs protesting California Proposition 64 — known as the LaRouche Initiative, after political activist Lyndon LaRouche, who proposed it — parade down San Francisco’s Market Street during the 17th annual Freedom Day Parade. The LaRouche Initiative, which was on the Nov. 4, 1986, ballot, proposed that all AIDS patients be quarantined and barred from school and food service jobs. It was rejected.

Photo: Jim Gerberich  /  The Associated Press

Demonstration at the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix Office, 10 June 1975
In Saskatchewan’s first gay demonstration twenty people demonstrated at the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix office to protest the newspaper’s refusal to print an advertisement submitted by the Gay Community Centre. The ad reported the results of a poll taken of candidates running in the 1975 provincial election.
Photo: Neil Richards

Demonstration at the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix Office, 10 June 1975

In Saskatchewan’s first gay demonstration twenty people demonstrated at the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix office to protest the newspaper’s refusal to print an advertisement submitted by the Gay Community Centre. The ad reported the results of a poll taken of candidates running in the 1975 provincial election.

Photo: Neil Richards

Star-Phoenix Picketed. Gay Community Protests Ad Decision

An account of the first gay demonstration in Saskatchewan. In June 1975 a small group marched at the office of the Saskatoon StarPhoenix angered by the the newspaper’s decision not to accept an ad from the Gay Community Centre. The ad listed the positions of Saskatoon election candidates relating to human rights legislation. The protestors declared that the ad refusal was just “one example of how gay people were refused access to the press.”

Star-Phoenix Picketed. Gay Community Protests Ad Decision

An account of the first gay demonstration in Saskatchewan. In June 1975 a small group marched at the office of the Saskatoon StarPhoenix angered by the the newspaper’s decision not to accept an ad from the Gay Community Centre. The ad listed the positions of Saskatoon election candidates relating to human rights legislation. The protestors declared that the ad refusal was just “one example of how gay people were refused access to the press.”