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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

likeiknewiwould:

From http://torontoist.com/2011/11/a-brief-history-of-pink-triangle-press/
[Description: A white button that shows its age. In the centre: top: TORONTO; middle: pink triangle pointing downward, black bold text overlay: NO MORE SHIT!; bottom: 6 FEB 81]
This image harkens back to:

1981 In the wake of the Toronto bathhouse raids, The Body Politic becomes a key forum for discussing the raids’ political implications and becomes a regular component of the ensuing rallies, where copies are distributed among the heated crowds.

likeiknewiwould:

From http://torontoist.com/2011/11/a-brief-history-of-pink-triangle-press/

[Description: A white button that shows its age. In the centre: top: TORONTO; middle: pink triangle pointing downward, black bold text overlay: NO MORE SHIT!; bottom: 6 FEB 81]

This image harkens back to:

1981 In the wake of the Toronto bathhouse raids, The Body Politic becomes a key forum for discussing the raids’ political implications and becomes a regular component of the ensuing rallies, where copies are distributed among the heated crowds.

(via canadianlesbianandgayarchives)

The Making of “Monsters”  |  Dir. John Greyson, 1991

During his residency at the Canadian Film Centre in 1991, John Greyson, the enfant terrible of gay cinema in Canada, directed The Making of “Monsters,” a short film dealing with the 1985 murder of a gay schoolteacher by five teenage boys in Toronto’s High Park. This fictional documentary chronicles a movie-of-the-week version of the event. There is a movie-within-the-movie produced by Hungarian Marxist and literary critic and theorist Georg Lukacs and directed by Bertolt Brecht, who inexplicably appears as a catfish in a bowl.
Brilliantly incorporating everything from Marxist aesthetics to hockey machismo to tire fires, Greyson made a film that is immensely enjoyable as well as a strong, fearless statement of gay pride. The Making of “Monsters”established John Greyson as one of Canada’s brightest talents.

If you have the chance to see this film, I recommend it. As a glimpse into the 80s queer struggle for safety and equal treatment under the law, it is enlightening. While seeking to counter mainstream cultural paradigms of masculinity, sex, and sexuality, Greyson deploys biting truths and scathing satire in catchy songs and choreographed dance. The film culminates in a call to action for all queers to bash back, and fight oppression together. Queer cinema at its finest.

The Making of “Monsters”  |  Dir. John Greyson, 1991

During his residency at the Canadian Film Centre in 1991, John Greyson, the enfant terrible of gay cinema in Canada, directed The Making of “Monsters,” a short film dealing with the 1985 murder of a gay schoolteacher by five teenage boys in Toronto’s High Park. This fictional documentary chronicles a movie-of-the-week version of the event. There is a movie-within-the-movie produced by Hungarian Marxist and literary critic and theorist Georg Lukacs and directed by Bertolt Brecht, who inexplicably appears as a catfish in a bowl.

Brilliantly incorporating everything from Marxist aesthetics to hockey machismo to tire fires, Greyson made a film that is immensely enjoyable as well as a strong, fearless statement of gay pride. The Making of “Monsters”established John Greyson as one of Canada’s brightest talents.

If you have the chance to see this film, I recommend it. As a glimpse into the 80s queer struggle for safety and equal treatment under the law, it is enlightening. While seeking to counter mainstream cultural paradigms of masculinity, sex, and sexuality, Greyson deploys biting truths and scathing satire in catchy songs and choreographed dance. The film culminates in a call to action for all queers to bash back, and fight oppression together. Queer cinema at its finest.

Voguing: The Message traces the roots of this gay, Black and Latino dance form, which appropriates and plays with poses and images from mainstream fashion. Voguing competitions parody fashion shows and rate the contestants on the basis of movement, appearance and costume. This tape is a pre-Madonna primer that raises questions about race, sex and subcultural style.


Dir. Jack Walworth, David Bronstein & Dorothy Low, 1988
13 min., USA