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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

Gay, Proud, and Healthy!

Headline that became a rallying cry attributed to Barbara Gittings, who co-authored with Frank Kameny this handout at the 1972 American Psychiatric Association Convention in Dallas.

Gay, Proud, and Healthy!

Headline that became a rallying cry attributed to Barbara Gittings, who co-authored with Frank Kameny this handout at the 1972 American Psychiatric Association Convention in Dallas.

John E. Fryer, Vanderbilt student photo, September 15, 1957

Vanderbilt Department of Medical Illustration, “Medical School Student Pictures, 1957: J.E. Fryer,” VUMC Through Time, accessed July 12, 2014  Eskind Biomedical Library Special Collections

Fifteen years later, would give a speech at the American Psychiatric Association annual conference, as Dr. H. Anonymous, which began: “I am a homosexual. I am a psychiatrist…”

John E. Fryer, Vanderbilt student photo, September 15, 1957

Vanderbilt Department of Medical Illustration,
“Medical School Student Pictures, 1957: J.E. Fryer,” 
VUMC Through Time, accessed July 12, 2014 
Eskind Biomedical Library Special Collections

Fifteen years later, would give a speech at the American Psychiatric Association annual conference, as Dr. H. Anonymous, which began: “I am a homosexual. I am a psychiatrist

The sickness label was an albatross around the neck of our early gay rights groups — it infected all our work on other issues. Anything we said on our behalf could be dismissed as ‘That’s just your sickness talking.’ The sickness label was used to justify discrimination, especially in employment, and especially by our own government.
Barbara Gittings
The Vote that ‘Cured’ Millions
The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide, July 2007

Gay Activist/Author Randolfe Hayden “Randy” Wicker Television Interview in 1972

"In 1972, gays answering blunt questions on television was new territory. I was the first homosexual to appear on television, full-faced & undisguised, in NYC on the Les Crane Show in 1965. I went to Chicago to be on the Kupcinent Show in the 1960s because there was no homosexual willing to appear on TV in Chicago." — Randy Wicker