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Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

richardrhyme:

The Toronto Sisters - The Abbey of the Divine Wood
Photo ©Richard Rhyme
https://www.facebook.com/TorontoSisters
http://www.torontosisters.org
https://twitter.com/torontosisters


A leading-edge order of queer nuns who have devoted ourselves to community service, ministry and outreach to those on the edges, and to promoting human rights, respect for diversity and spiritual enlightenment. We believe all people have a right to express their unique joy and beauty and we use humor and irreverent wit to expose the forces of bigotry, complacency and guilt that chain the human spirit.

richardrhyme:

The Toronto Sisters - The Abbey of the Divine Wood

Photo ©Richard Rhyme

https://www.facebook.com/TorontoSisters

http://www.torontosisters.org

https://twitter.com/torontosisters

A leading-edge order of queer nuns who have devoted ourselves to community service, ministry and outreach to those on the edges, and to promoting human rights, respect for diversity and spiritual enlightenment. We believe all people have a right to express their unique joy and beauty and we use humor and irreverent wit to expose the forces of bigotry, complacency and guilt that chain the human spirit.

Memorial for Stormé DeLarverie  |  May 29, 2014

Storme, early activist in the LGBT movement, was honored by hundreds who turned out for her memorial service in Greenwich Village 5/29/2014. Her identity incorporated her own mixed race, her career as a male-impersation MC of the Jewel Box Review & protector of all those who were vulnerable to unfair physical abuse.

— Filmed by Randolfe Wicker

Images from “FAG,” my first zine, 2013. I had an idea that, if you’re gonna call me dirty names, you should be just as prepared to say such things to the kid version of me, because I was just as much a fag then as now. I wanted there to be a high contrast between the sweetness of the photos and harshness of the words. — dgchristie

(via joancrawfordsmarblem)

Stormé DeLarverie, 24 December 1920 – 24 May 2014

An interview with lesbian Stonewall veteran Stormé DeLarverie

The conversation turned to the night in June of 1969 at the Stonewall Inn where she made history. Quite a few friends, writers and historians over the years have identified her as the tough cross dressing lesbian who was clubbed by the NYPD, which evoked enough indignation and anger to spur the crowd to action. She was identified as the Stonewall Lesbian in Charles Kaiser’s book The Gay Metropolis, and her scuffle with the police has been mentioned a few times in passing by The New York Times in the past couple of decades. Then in the January 2008 issue of Curve Magazine she identified herself as the Stonewall Lesbian in a detailed interview with writerPatrick Hinds, an excerpt of which is below:

”[The officer] then yelled, ‘I said, move along, faggot.’ I think he thought I was a boy. When I refused, he raised his nightstick and clubbed me in the face.” It was then that the crowd surged and started attacking the police with whatever they could find, she said.

I asked my last question hesitantly. “Have you heard of the Stonewall Lesbian? The woman who was clubbed outside the bar but was never identified?” DeLarverie nodded, rubbing her chin in the place where she received 14 stitches after the beating. “Yes,” she said quietly. “They were talking about me.”

And then, almost as an afterthought, I asked, “Why did you never come forward to take credit for what you did?”

She thought for a couple of seconds before she answered, “Because it was never anybody’s business.”

I asked her if she still remembered that night. She answered in the affirmative. After the cop hit her on the head, she socked him with her fist. “I hit him,” she said. “He was bleeding.”

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Photo: Sam Bassett