Skip to Navigation ↓Skip to Content ↓
Commie Pinko Fag

The Red Scare, The Pink Scare and the Homosexual Agenda

brettgleasonmusic

Happy National Coming Out Day! I recently interviewed my Mom about my coming out and learned some interesting family facts, wineglass in hand.

Funny mentioning, coming out while driving — I actually came out to to my mom as an atheist at 14 while she was driving… there was a sudden heavy swerve on the ‘straight’ road… and later I had to agree to go to ‘bible camp’ so they would drop the ‘issue’…

i agreed — primarily because my boy crush was going to be at the camp…

it was another 5 years, and hundreds of miles from where I grew up, before I was in a safe place to come out as queer…

It’s always good to see/hear of supportive family members.

…if we succumb to despair we will help ensure that the worst will happen. And if we grasp the hopes that exist and work to make the best use of them, there might be a better world.

Not much of a choice.

Noam Chomsky

(via brentpruitt)

The RejectedDr. Karl Bowman explaining Kinsey’s 1948 study on KQED’s “The Rejected,” September 1961

The hour-long documentary aired at 9:30 p.m. on Monday, September 11. Typical of most programs about homosexuality, “The Rejected” did not include lesbians. But it was perhaps the first scripted documentary to discuss homosexuality from a calm and rational point of view. Response was mostly positive. KQED was inundated with letters following the broadcast, with many of them requests for transcripts. Only a tiny minority, 3% according to station officials, wrote to complain. “The Rejected” also received critical acclaim, with the San Francisco Chronicle saying “KQED handled the subject soberly, calmly and in great depth.” It also received national notice, and was broadcast on several other public TV stations between 1961 and 1963, including in Tucson, Los Angeles, Portland and New York. Despite that, no film of the program is known to exist. Only the transcripts and news reports remain. More>

The Rejected
Dr. Karl Bowman explaining Kinsey’s 1948 study on KQED’s “The Rejected,” September 1961

The hour-long documentary aired at 9:30 p.m. on Monday, September 11. Typical of most programs about homosexuality, “The Rejected” did not include lesbians. But it was perhaps the first scripted documentary to discuss homosexuality from a calm and rational point of view. Response was mostly positive. KQED was inundated with letters following the broadcast, with many of them requests for transcripts. Only a tiny minority, 3% according to station officials, wrote to complain. “The Rejected” also received critical acclaim, with the San Francisco Chronicle saying “KQED handled the subject soberly, calmly and in great depth.” It also received national notice, and was broadcast on several other public TV stations between 1961 and 1963, including in Tucson, Los Angeles, Portland and New York. Despite that, no film of the program is known to exist. Only the transcripts and news reports remain. More>

Biconic Flashpoints: 4 Decades of Bay Area Bisexual PoliticPhoto from the exhibition May – Aug 2014GLBT History Museum, GLBT Historical Society, San Francisco

Drawing on materials from the personal archives of longtime bisexual activists as well as the holdings of the GLBT Historical Society’s archives, the Biconic Flashpoints exhibit showcases never-displayed artifacts, video, and photos from key moments in the Bay Area’s bisexual political history.

Biconic Flashpoints: 4 Decades of Bay Area Bisexual Politic
Photo from the exhibition May – Aug 2014
GLBT History Museum, GLBT Historical Society, San Francisco

Drawing on materials from the personal archives of longtime bisexual activists as well as the holdings of the GLBT Historical Society’s archives, the Biconic Flashpoints exhibit showcases never-displayed artifacts, video, and photos from key moments in the Bay Area’s bisexual political history.